Wednesday Traffic

So.

  1. Hitting the nail with the noetic hammer.
  2. We would be guessing alcohol was involved.
  3. Energy weapons, … although the writer misses that one suggestion is that energy weapons are used in space because of the small¬†momentum transfer (low recoil).
  4. But those duecedly odd and uncouth chemical weapons can join the “Interwebs of things”. Reprising, I guess, Richard Stallman’s notion that every program grows until it can send email to, every houshold appliance gains intelligence until it can serve a web page.
  5. So, Wooly mammoth got the flu?
  6. I realize my very smart dietitian once said “cheese isn’t food, it’s a condiment” and that advice is very good for my cholesterol levels, but … cheese!!!! (grommit).
  7. Ouch evolved.
  8. Now, just apply that indemnity from suit to medicine, nuclear power, and other desirable technologies and we’d have more useful progress in other fields.

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8 comments

  1. Boonton says:

    #8 I daresay I suspect there’s been more innovation in the medical field in the last 3 years than there has been in Google Search results.

  2. Mark says:

    Boonton,
    But do you think there has been more innovation in medicine that computers? New ideas? New products?

    Name two completely new innovations in medicine in the last year.

  3. Mark says:

    Re google search vs medical innovation. That’s like saying “there’s been more innovation in consumer electronics than in stethoscopes”. Compare something more akin to apples to other fruit.

  4. Mark says:

    What would be the “google driverless car” medical field equivalent?

  5. Boonton says:

    From 2014 medical news:

    * Ebola vaccine being tested in humans

    * HIV possibly cured in two babies

    * First baby born from a womb transplant

    * Human lungs grown in a lab (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/272763.php)

    * First ‘bionic’ eye implant restored sight to a man blind for 30 years.

    * 18 children cured of the ‘bubble boy’ disease by stem cell based gene therapy

    * Hepatitis C cure

    That is just 2014. The ‘driverless car’ is a novelty so far compared to any of those. What else do you want to throw against that? The Apple Watch? Ohh not yet available. Being able to book a taxi ride with uber? Slightly better iphone? ipad with more pixels? Xbox 360….which is purposefully not backwards compatible with Xbox games?

  6. Mark says:

    Boonton,
    By your criteria (“The Apple Watch? Ohh not yet available.”) “being available” is required. Of your 7 instances, only perhaps the second to last is actually available (and it is available mostly because it has a almost negligible applicant base). How many of those things are available at your local pharmacist or Hospital? Oh, none. Ah, well (oddly enough to get the vaccine out this year it is almost certain that protocols are being overriden to get it out faster … after all the vaccine has been in the works for 35 years, so of course it has to be rushed).

    I am really really surprised that you really think that being protected from lawsuits does not spur innovation *and* pretend that economic motives are important.

    How about breaking a teraflop for under 10 watts? (Nvidia/Intel). Or this.

  7. Boonton says:

    How many of those things are available at your local pharmacist or Hospital? Oh, none. Ah, well (oddly enough to get the vaccine out this year it is almost certain that protocols are being overriden to get it out faster … after all the vaccine has been in the works for 35 years, so of course it has to be rushed).

    Hep C is available now, see Sovaldi.

    The HIV cure for babies can be replicated where applicable and if your wife had a baby with the ‘bubble boy’ disease the therapy would probably be applicable and available. There has not been an ebola vaccine for 35 years, although testing it is tricky because as the epidemic receeds it is difficult to know if declining infection rates is due to the vaccine working or simply due to the virus leaving a populated area, although if I had to guess at least one vaccine will be demonstrated safe this year and it will be available to those exposing themselves to ebola patients with an open question of how effective it is.

    Granted other items are more proofs of concepts but if we expand our criteria from just 2014 to the last decade or so we can start adding innovations that moved from POC state to everyday treatments that are helping thousands of people. For example, making HIV more a chronic disease with anti-virals. The prospect of nearly eliminating cervical cancer with a vaccine. The many drugs introduced that treat specific cancers either in replacement of or as a complement to chemotherapy. And so on.

  8. Boonton says:

    Also I’m not seeing the defamation immunity cited as an innovative regulatory innovation. The concept of defamation was the entity responsible for the speech is sued for defamation.

    So would being able to sue Google for defamation because they link to a website the defames you be an extension of that concept? No it wouldn’t. That would be like suing a newsstand or a library because they carry a magazine that published a defamatory article about you. Cleary in 1900 if the law was that librarians or newsstand owners had to personally read and review every issue of every publication they carried to screen it for defamation, it would have greatly hampered the publishing industry.

    The law then isn’t really immunity from lawsuits, it is a clarrification that the principles of the pre-digital age would extend into the digital age. If you think about it, defamation lawsuits have probably become easier since Google makes it easier for you to find and document anyone defaming you.