Monday/Tuesday Highlights

So, emergency run Sunday night through today to a customer site. Ahm back.

  1. To distinguish from the amphibian crises.
  2. A description of liberal attitudes.
  3. Summertime homework.
  4. Grist for the marriage discussion.
  5. Sounds likely, although I think the correlation is that increased wealth leads to more consumption and wealth tracks also with green.
  6. Two dismal wizards disagree.
  7. Qualified is not a high on the Democratic voter’s list of concerns.
  8. When I was growing up, reading the books, honor was important and I still think it is. Killing your children however doesn’t remotely connect with any notion of honorable actions that I’ve ever heard of. It would be nice if the right meaning of honor became the primary one again.
  9. Tis true.
  10. He rode and tried to get back in the bunch for almost an hour. Remember that.
  11. I suspect caffeine and alcohol and sugar aren’t on this list.
  12. Put these two posts together, here and here.
  13. A book noted. another one of a different sort.

6 Responses to Monday/Tuesday Highlights

  1. 11.I suspect caffeine and alcohol and sugar aren’t on this list.

    Are we talking a list of mind altering substances banned by various religions or used? While some ban caffeine, alcohol and sugar (or I suppose limit sugar, can you really ban it?) I can’t think of any religion that actually uses those 3 for purposes of entering a mind altered state. However, this could be an opportunity to enter an underserved market if you’re interested in a partnership.

  2. Re #11: If you’re following the HBO series The Leftovers, there is a fictional religion/cult whose adherents chain smoke as part of their faith. So there’s tobacco for your list.

  3. #5 5.Sounds likely, although I think the correlation is that increased wealth leads to more consumption and wealth tracks also with green.

    I think you may have something like a sideways S curve. If you’re very poor, your energy consumption is going to be low (fewer appliances, smaller house, fewer gadgets = less stuff to plug in). As you start to get weathier it will shoot up (give someone on welfare a $1000 windfall and you’re likely to see a big TV get sold at a nearby store…for example). But then get even wealthier and you’ll start to go down (you can now afford the ‘energy star’ appliance that costs a few hundred more…for example). Then it will start to go up again slowly if you start climbing into the 1% and upwards (a 50 room mansion is going to take a lot of power…even if you are very on top of replacing all the light bulbs with those squiggly ones). To me that hints the middle class might be a ‘sweet spot’ for energy efficiency barring people living a very ascetic life below that or people who are very rich but fanatical on conservational projects like home based power plants etc.

  4. Not mentioned was electric bills that put where you stand in relation to your neighbors. I believe such bills had the effect of causing very high using households to cut back so they wouldn’t ‘stand out’ as much…even though no one else would know what they use.

  5. Boonton,
    This was in the UK I think. Where do the “your neighbors bill” appear? I haven’t heard of that.

    although I think the correlation is that increased wealth leads to more consumption and wealth tracks also with green.

    That’s what I tried to say.

  6. Experiment happened in Sacremento CA (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/31/science/earth/31compete.html?_r=0) They not only compared you to your neighbors but gave you a smiley or frowny face. Impact was modest, 2% reduction versus those who didn’t get the personalized statements. Still in terms of energy use that’s not trivial.

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