Wednesday Highlights

So, after midnight last night, power was restored. Now the Hurricane Sandy/Katrina survivors are not impressed by 30 hours (but with fresh water and gas) as something to note, and it wasn’t that bad, but … it is nice to have power again nevertheless.

Links?

  1. Something liberal school administrators (and politicians) have trouble understanding.
  2. Case in point.
  3. A weak defense of Ms Clinton’s rape defense case.
  4. Weather.
  5. Two lists, one with everything not that is not a empty hard vacuum and the other list has everything else. Not very useful, eh?
  6. And then … I met Mr Clinton.
  7. So, I’m going to not remark overmuch on the Hobby Lobby decision which brought a big explosion of stupid from the left (e.g., “this mean if I have a religious call to kill this decision allows that” (Chicago Tribune columnist … hint: no it doesn’t) or Gosh why do companies like Hobby Lobby not object to viagra (Pheminist Filosophers … hint: a closely held company could … but consider what you’re asking about … d’ya think you can find a real religion worshiped in this country by any plurality that doesn’t favor fertility and family over killing children and fetus? Theology and life vs death. Not very hard to imagine.) This post, is the closest to an intelligent response from the left, but strikes out on point 5, in which he somehow forgets the reasoning that was allowed sort of in point 2 … that is the court found that the burdening of beliefs was not tenable (for closely held corps) when non-burdened alternatives exist, which they did as it was allowed already for others. Or in other words, see the first itemized point in this post.
  8. Here’s someone who believes the IRS “lost” all those emails by 6 independent computers all “happened” to be eaten by their respective dogs. The point is moot, as the most reasonable response is to allow that the matters which these emails where to have “cleared up” is, on failure to produce the requested data, that it means the accusation is deemed to have been found true.
  9. So, if true, the IRS under Obama has been totally corrupted by partisan bias. Welcome to the new world, in which the left has decided a partisan IRS is a good thing. Wonder if they’ll still feel that way the next time we have President from the right. After all, everyone does agree that turnabout is fair play … that’s axiomatic, right?
  10. A statistic.
  11. This point might also be recalled during homosexuality is sin discussions.
  12. On the poverty and Ms Clinton affair. I also read Mr Clinton has offered that “we were 7 million in debt” … ahem. Mr Clinton, I’m pretty sure your debts were all covered (off the books, IRS-wise) by selling pardons in your last week or so in office.
  13. I disagree with this SCOTUS ruling. I’d offer that no union should be able to collect “dues” from any non-members. Ever. Under any conditions. Not one penny. That’s just wrong.
  14. My interest has waxed … we’re getting closer to the finals. For what it’s worth, I’m rooting for the Netherlands (mostly because they skated so well in the winter Olympics).
  15. A fellow blogger under duress.
  16. It can order. It cannot compel.
  17. If this is news for you. I’ve got more … kindergarten is over. Grow up.

8 Responses to Wednesday Highlights

  1. 3.A weak defense of Ms Clinton’s rape defense case.

    Seems pretty air tight to me. More interestingly, since anyone running for president is running for an office that requires an oath to uphold the Constitution, no critic of Ms Clinton in this respect can ethically run against her.

    Now the criticism that she shouldn’t have said publically long after the case that she didn’t believe her client was innocent is on target IMO. However how much traction you’re going to get from that seems pretty thin to me. The offense probably is probably mitigated by the fact that the defendant died in the early 90’s and the interview might not have been meant to be public until after he died.

  2. IRS

    1. Err no it is not a principle of law that if one side cannot produce a document the other side gets to assume anything it wants about its contents. That would make for all types of amusing lawsuits like:

    How about my pay for commenting on your blog? Back in 2010 you said you’d pay me. Produce all your sent emails. Ohhh wait, don’t have them? Guess we have to assume i’m right!

    2. The IT ticket noting the crashed drives was made months before the email requests. Is the claim that nefarious conspirators faked the IT ticket in anticipation of a request for all emails? If people are willing to do that why not just delete suspect emails from the record?

    3. The descriptions do indeed ring true for how email is handled in most large organizations. Places I’ve worked for will not save email unless you make special provisions to save specific emails….and then the archive usually is on the employees laptop. I strongly suspect blanket requests for emails going back to 2009 or before are less than likely to be fully fulfilled.

    4. This does in fact smell of a manufactured scandal. Take any large organization and keep asking for documents. Sooner or later you will run up against a wall. If your motive is political points rather than a real investigation you can then say all the evidence you couldn’t find is hidden behind the wall.

  3. Boonton,
    Regarding #1, err, no. Your presumption would make for the amusing, “Oh, you subpoenaed those emails/documents/evidence?” Sorry. Server crashed/Dog ate it/We lost it. Sorry.

    Places I’ve worked for will not save email unless you make special provisions to save specific emails.

    Any of those organizations use Lotus Notes or Outlook exchange? There are backups, you just didn’t know it.

    This does in fact smell of a manufactured scandal.

    I see. You are one of the people who believe in the statistical improbability of 7 hard drives all just happening to fail?

  4. Boonton,
    Re: IRS. You have not seemed to notice the irony of the IRS not holding their own data while requiring everyone else to hold to standards which they do not follow themselves. Wonder if they’ll garnish their own pay?

  5. Any of those organizations use Lotus Notes or Outlook exchange? There are backups, you just didn’t know it.

    Yes, I’ve seen email policies where emails are saved 60 days. If you choose ‘archive’ you get two years but you have to manually put each email in the archive.

    Email is non-trivial. My work email is holding something like 15,000 emails at 6.7 gigs. Lots of those emails are just copies of the same thing (long email chain where everyone keeps replying copying the same email over and over). Archiving, if you do it, happens on your local drive. The policy is clearly to let most emails delete after time.

    I don’t think the issue is so much hard drive space as it is searching. I’m wickedly good at keyword searching my archives and finding old emails about issues thatwere forgotten about. But the price I pay is that I’m email heavy with anywhere from 200-1000 unread messages in my inbox at any given time. If everyone saved every email searches would probably get harder and harder….unless you’re Google.

    Most people loose almost all of their emails to the 60 day window and no there’s no backup to that…at least after a long period of time has passed. I did work with one guy back in 2005 or so who printed every email he got/sent and stored it in huge binders. IMO he was insane.

    Re: IRS. You have not seemed to notice the irony of the IRS not holding their own data while requiring everyone else to hold to standards which they do not follow themselves.

    You’re only required to keep financial records.

    Regarding #1, err, no. Your presumption would make for the amusing, “Oh, you subpoenaed those emails/documents/evidence?” Sorry. Server crashed/Dog ate it/We lost it. Sorry.

    Err yea that’s more or less what happens. If the records no longer exist then you can’t subpoena them. Why do you think the NSA’s been keeping all that metadata? Because the phone companies don’t want to keep it.

    Any large organization, if you keep pushing, you’ll eventually run into stuff you can’t get out of them.

  6. Boonton,
    15k emails is 7 gigs. 7 gigs is nothing, you can spend under a $100 and have a terabyte drive. Tapes go to around 200 terabytes.

    You’re only required to keep financial records.

    Which describes communications with and between the IRS quite nicely.

    If the records no longer exist then you can’t subpoena them.

    Let me know why the tobacco companies (a) kept memos and (b) didn’t just say the dog ate them.

    Any large organization, if you keep pushing, you’ll eventually run into stuff you can’t get out of them.

    And government related email isn’t one of those things that any reasonable policy loses.

  7. Boonton,
    Hmm. What was the “Bond” quote? Once is happenstance, Twice is coincidence, three times is enemy action. 7 computers all having hard disk crashes. Not a coincidence.

  8. Why would an employee have 7 computers all with synced email? I’ve used MS-Exchange at work, your emails are auto-erased after a period of time set by the administrator (say 60 days) unless you archive them, in which case they live on your hard drive.

    What’s interesting is that many organizations I’ve seen make positive efforts to prevent you from having serious dealings via email. For example, when I refinanced my mortgage I had to use a special ‘secured website’ system to send pdfs of various documents but normal email worked fine for correspondance with the loan officers. Likewise when I refinanced a car loan.

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