Monday Highlights

Good morning.

  1. Biplane trainers at the tail end of the Pacific war.
  2. Slavery, modern.
  3. Sounds like an Israeli mistake, sending over 10’s of thousands of concrete construction slabs and not realizing how many are disappearing.
  4. Free will.
  5. Cost and higher education, here and here.
  6. The final point is good, if the “Redskins” are bad ’cause they are insulting to some … how about “Fighting Irish”, which too can be taken as an ethnic slur.
  7. Goals.
  8. Barricade relocation to White House … two views here and here.
  9. Obama and counter-terror operations.
  10. Huff puff.
  11. A long post considering Russia and the US.
  12. Beltway discord.
  13. Structural discord.

5 Responses to Monday Highlights

  1. 6.The final point is good, if the “Redskins” are bad ’cause they are insulting to some … how about “Fighting Irish”, which too can be taken as an ethnic slur.

    ‘Fighting’ is a verb, which makes sense for a competitive sports team. (Although I’d be surprised if in all of Israel you’d find a single team called ‘the fighting Jews’). Also while there are multiple historic slurs against the Irish ‘fighting’ hasn’t really been a big one IMO as a negative slur.

    Redskins is an adjective whose primary focus is perceived skin tone and slurs based on skin tone have a much more loaded history IMO.

  2. Boonton,
    In the term “Fighting Irish” … fighting is not a verb. It refers the propensity of the Irish to drunken brawling (as a slur).

    Redskins is an adjective whose primary focus is perceived skin tone

    In actual modern language I think you’ll find the primary use of the term refers to a East Coast football team (or one of the 100s of High Schools which use the term). Who exactly uses that term today? Do you seriously think people are primarily thinking/using that term as a derogatory racial term?

  3. In the term “Fighting Irish” … fighting is not a verb. It refers the propensity of the Irish to drunken brawling

    Errr, that would be a verb. But it again isn’t linked directly to drunkenness. The phrase ‘got my Irish up’ simply means whatever it was made you angry, not drunk. An Irish temper is not required to be linked to being drunk. In contrast a team named “Drunk Irish Bastards” whose mascot consisted of surely red-haired Irishmen drooling beer out of the side of his mouth would probably not garner as much affection.

    Redskins does refer to skin color and has a long history as derogatory. Granted the term is no longer used today except by those making Western movies or as the names of sports teams.

    Do you seriously think people are primarily thinking/using that term as a derogatory racial term?

    No, but should that matter?

  4. Boonton,

    Errr, that would be a verb.

    It is describing a noun. It is an adjective (or more precisely, now looking it up as a “verbal” a verb form which acts as a noun or adjective). (another take)

    No, but should that matter?

    Of course. I suspect you (and nobody you know) has never ever ever heard “Redskin” used as a racial slur. If you want to take offense, you should find things which actually are meant offensively sometimes not never anyone’s living memory.

    Redskins does refer to skin color and has a long history as derogatory.

    Yes. But not for more than a century. Roman in France was likely a derogatory term 2000 years ago. Perhaps that shouldn’t be term in use either (likely Senator at the same time for the same reason). I know you libs love the PC language cleaning thing, but geesh, why not restrict your pretend offense to actual terms in use which actually have racial intent and not this faux outrage crap. Or is it some ego/guilt stroking thing?

  5. Yes. But not for more than a century.

    Come come, Are you telling me ‘redskin’ used as a slur has not been heard in America (except for historical dramas) since 1910?! Perhaps if you limited your case to the ‘living memory’ of people alive today you’d have a slightly better case but now you’ve overstepped things quite a bit.

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