Monday Highlights

Good morning.

  1. Magic decoder ring?
  2. How we have not progressed in 140 years?
  3. Cinema.
  4. Apparently Mr Derbyshire ruffled some feathers, here’s one sympathetic take.
  5. Gas prices.
  6. National debt.
  7. Middle of the road-sitter, on the Zimmerman/NBC tape edit.
  8. Don’t sneeze.
  9. So, can private clubs choose their own membership criteria.
  10. Countering the prevailing notions on education and religion.
  11. An unusual choice on a “sexual orientation” multiple guess, uhm, quiz?
  12. Mr Holder is blind and deaf. Why? He thinks Congress acts with “deliberate judgement.” He apparently has never seen Congress in action.
  13. Two twins to confound the race theorists and racists alike.

25 Responses to Monday Highlights

  1. 9.So, can private clubs choose their own membership criteria.

    It would seem they can. And likewise private citizens, even public ones, can express their opinions about whether their membership criteria is a good or bad idea.

    12.Mr Holder is blind and deaf. Why? He thinks Congress acts with “deliberate judgement.” He apparently has never seen Congress in action.

    Cute, but devoid of substance. Does volokh and company really want to argue for the concept that courts should start getting into the judging the merits of the debate that lead up to a bill passing? It’s accepted law that passed bills are presumed constitutional until proven otherwise. It would be a radical break to suddenly declare that only bills passed with ‘serious debate’ by lawmakers acting as Platonic philosopher-kings rather than politicians should be presumed Constitutional while other ones will be presumed otherwise.

  2. 5.Gas prices.

    It occurred to me that the problem with gas prices and behavior is that there’s not much of a link. People talk about ‘hyper-miling’, getting more miles out of your gallon, because gas prices don’t impact behavior. If it did they people would also talk of hypomiling…finding ways to cut down on the number of driving miles you actually do. If gas is $0.20 more per gallong you’ll either try to get more miles per gallon or just pay more but it seems like most people will change everything but the actual miles driven.

    Which is somewhat odd because if gas prices were really that important there’s lots of easy ways to cut out miles. Working from home one day a week, for example, slashes your commutting miles 20%. No magic technology, no new car, no having to learn radical new behaviors or alter how often you service you car, bam 20% saving.

    Granted plenty of people have jobs where working from home is never an option, but lots do where it is sometimes an option. Yet they don’t. Likewise plenty of people I know are, well stupid with miles. Taking three trips to accomplish two errands, for example. I get that sometimes one gets cabin fever and just wants to drive around but…well…it doesn’t impact their behavior very much.

    The huge spike in prices that happened in 2007/8 did, I think, show some actual behavior changes. But I suspect even that would be less dramatic if you backed out the job losses caused by the recession (no matter how cheap gas is, you’re not going to drive to work every day if you don’t have a job).

    If people focused a bit on hypo-miling, though, I think you’d get a lot more bang for the buck in terms of lifestyle. If my work was, say, 5 miles closer, I’d save everyday on time, wear and tear on my car, and risk of accident. Even if gas was free, those other things have real costs to me. You can say that America has a driving lifestyle….’living free’…’open roads’ and all that but that’s just an excuse. Going back and forth to places you ‘have too’ is just that, stuff you have to do. You’re not some free cowboy roaming the open field taking on whatever adventures life gives you. If I was 5 miles closer I’d be saving 1,250 miles per year driving back and forth to work. Quite enough to do a very big road trip or two and lots of true ‘pleasure driving’ while still ending up saving on miles.

  3. Apparently Mr Derbyshire ruffled some feathers, here’s one sympathetic take.

    I’m curious, do you think the piece was racist?

  4. I’ll be somewhat dramatic here, from reading the Chicago Boys excerpt I’ll say no (I’ll reserve judgement in case there’s other points not quoted by the blog). There are points where I suspect he might be wrong and might be using his imagination rather than actual objective measurements (is black-on-white violence worse, on average than black-on-black? five percent of blacks radically ‘anti-white’? sounds like these are just ‘gut feelings’ which a mathematically minded, esp. a statistically minded person, should recognize are most likely wrong and seek to get really objective numbers). But being wrong isn’t quite the same as being racist.

  5. Read the whole piece. It’s explicitly racist.

  6. Still not quite sure, but I notice this:

    (13) In that pool of forty million, there are nonetheless many intelligent and well-socialized blacks. (I’ll use IWSB as an ad hoc abbreviation.) You should consciously seek opportunities to make friends with IWSBs. In addition to the ordinary pleasures of friendship, you will gain an amulet against potentially career-destroying accusations of prejudice.

    Perhaps this is why he was fired. When liberals assert that blacks like Hermain Cain and Clarance Thomas are just tokens the right uses to try to shield themselves from being accused of racism, isn’t he saying the same thing? Except he views it as a feature rather than a bug of the right wing ideological system. I mean why were we told over and over again that Herman Cain was some type of great representative of the Tea Party mindset? In reality he was only slightly more intelligent than Sarah Palin. So what gives? Well here it is, an amulet against charges of racism. Who cares if dozens of people in your rabble are holding up racist anti-Obama signs, if they cheer for Cain then you can shut up any liberal who complains about racism as just being politically correct. If I were you JA, I wouldn’t be too eager to join the right wingers who want to excommunicate this guy. He might be targetted because he’s just being exceptionally honest here.

    Now in terms of intellectual bankrutpcy, there’s a lot to be desired in this piece. You can tell like many on the right he enjoys poking liberals in the nose by striking the politically incorrect pose out of sheer pleasure in self aggrandizement. This all might have been provakative in 1992 but it’s rather old now, IMO.

    Is he saying anything that Chris Rock didn’t say, minus the irony and humor of course? More importanly, he hasn’t gone beyond anything Chris Rock hasn’t said. Why are conservatives obsessed with finding ‘amulets’ against racism? Why for that matter is liberal culture, well, just so ‘not lame’? In all honesty who do you think is most likely to give you a funny but truthful observation about liberal foibles, Rush Limbaugh or Bill Maher? Why is liberalism capable of introspection but conservatism seems incapable of it?

    Why is black culture so successful in the US given the huge amounts of dysfunction he would associate with ‘the average’ black? Why is racism such a taboo given that blacks make up a rather small minority of the electorate? Perhaps most devasting why does he say that demand outstrips supply in point 15? Certainly any good market orientated conservative will say that a high luxury price gurantees suppliers will supply to the market. If token conservative intellectuals are so highly prized then why don’t blacks supply such a market? There’s no shortage of aspiring sports wannabes, hip-hop wannabes and so on. Why a shortage of blacks trying to cash in by playing the token conservative? Perhaps the reason is the question is backwards. Perhaps the limited supply isn’t intellectual blacks for right wing groups to adopt, perhaps the limited supply is insecure conservatives willing and needing to purchase ‘credibility’ by having a ‘black friend’ or clapping for a ‘black conservative’ at a rally. Somehow I don’t see, say, Bill Maher sucking up to a black intellectual he doesn’t think much of because he feels the need to have an ‘amulet’ against racism.

    A conservative that would address these questions with something other than a variation on a vast left wing conspiracy might actually stumble upon something interesting to say. We’ve yet to find one but I’d hold off before jumping on top of someone who may have actually begun to try.

  7. Another interesting observation about his ‘talk’ and the other talk. His talk basically boils down to if you know nothing else, you’re statistically better off avoiding inner city black neighborhoods. Beyond that the average don’t help you much since the range of human diversity is too large and too overlapping to make useful individual judgements based on race. Again Chris Rock told liberals this almost 20 years ago.

    What I notice he is missing is his ‘talk’ is largely about problems that whites can and do easily avoid. Yes I suppose you can imagine stories about taking the wrong turn in some city you’re unfamiliar with and at that momen your car breaks down in the seediest place you ever seen, but for the most part whites can easily avoid the dangers he discusses unless they have a drug problem which demands they do business on inner city streets.

    The problem on the other side of ‘the talk’ is that there is no escape. Yes perhaps at something like the Million Man March, a black person can feel relatively comfortable he isn’t going to get hassled by cops or presumed to be a criminal, but in everyday life the problem manifests itself. The presumption of being wrong or bad unless one purposefully puts on effort to look like a prep school boy is not a ‘wrong turn into the unfamiliar part of the city’ but everyday life. I think the issue over the Martin affair has such power because it touches this nerve. The mental image of the kid being aware that he was being followed by a strange man and unsure what to do….dammed if he did or didn’t….run and you look like you’re trying to get away from a crime, stand and it looks like you’re trying to be a gangster.

    Derb. would have perhaps touched upon something interesting if he could have made the leap to connect his ‘talk’ as just a mirror image of the other talk he was trying to parady and mock. Unfortunately conservatives are only capable of ‘getting psychological’ about bias when they are talking about so-called media bias.

  8. Boonton,

    Does volokh and company really want to argue for the concept that courts should start getting into the judging the merits of the debate that lead up to a bill passing?

    How do you read that into what was said? You have a strange method for extracting meaning from text. The obvious point is that “deliberate judgement” is not a good description of the antics of Congress and to suppose/suggest that’s the case is evidence of being blind to what is happening around you.

    Kind of like Obama’s bald lie, claiming that this bill passed with a great majority, i.e., with no votes from the other part and the exceptional “reconciliation” move to squeak it through.

  9. Boonton,
    My take is that most methods of tweaking mileage are incremental, technology and not. You can tweak 10% by getting a gauge, by hypo/hyper miling, by installing a FAS switch and so on.

    No magic technology, no new car, no having to learn radical new behaviors or alter how often you service you car, bam 20% saving.

    Actually that’s not true. Remember I regularly got 80mpg with my Insight. That’s not 20% it’s a factor of 2 or 3.

  10. JA,
    I think the response was more racist than the piece. Getting away from racism means in part, “we can talk about race.” Clearly we cannot, if “you’re fired (or way beyond the pale)” is the response to one man’s opinion, which are largely supportable by statistics or inference.

    Boonton,
    5% has no error bars? .. When I was a kid and my mom volunteered with programs helping tutor and teach inner city black children in the summer, my mom brought her kids (me and my brother) along often ’cause we were too young and she didn’t use sitters much. Anyhow, twice I was assaulted in the pool in attempted drownings. If there were 75 kids in the one case and 40 in the second (which seems like the number I recall) … is 5% so far off? No other kid came to my aid, … does the 50% will stand by … too small a number?

    This seems to smack of the firing of Mr Summers from Harvard, who said non-PC but statistically accurate things about women in maths and science and got fired for it. Were his statements anti-feminist and hateful? No.

    Unfortunately conservatives are only capable of ‘getting psychological’ about bias when they are talking about so-called media bias.

    You fail to recall Mr Groseclose’ book, a long scholarly look at media bias which is based on statistical methods not “getting psychological”.

  11. Boonton,
    I should add, the VW XL1 will be sold (out of my price range, alas) next year, it gets over 200mpg. Technology is not a 20% thing, it’s factors of 2-10.

  12. Kind of like Obama’s bald lie, claiming that this bill passed with a great majority, i.e., with no votes from the other part and the exceptional “reconciliation” move to squeak it through.

    Last time I checked a majority meant more than 50%. The PPACA passed the Senate with a vote of 60-39. That’s well in excess of 50%. Obama never claimed Senate Republicans voted for the bill, so what? Care to show me where in the Constitution the Republican Party is given any special say in anything?

    The obvious point is that “deliberate judgement” is not a good description of the antics of Congress …

    Non-responsive. Exactly what major bills passed by Congress are done so in a way you would approve? How does this effect their Constitutionality presumption in law? Legislative politics has never been a nice business. Despite the delusions of you and people like you, there was nothing done in the passage of the health bill that hasn’t been done by your side many times before in all types of legislation.

    My take is that most methods of tweaking mileage are incremental, technology and not. You can tweak 10% by getting a gauge, by hypo/hyper miling, by installing a FAS switch and so on.

    But note that miling here always means getting more miles per gallon, rarely does it seem to ask must you really drive all those miles? Again if my commute shrank by 5 miles per day that would be a great thing for me, even if gas was free! Just like you view the gallon of gas as a cost to be avoided if possible, you might do well to consider the miles themselves as a cost.

  13. 5% and your sample of two incidents.

    Not really much help. How many other kids were assalted by attempted drownings? Did all the inner city kids play nice with each other until you, the little white kid, showed up? Unlikely, kids are nasty creatures and very nasty to outsiders which is what you were. You’d have to back that influence out before you’d start calculating what portion of your assalt might be attributed to you being white.

  14. Boonton,

    Obama never claimed Senate Republicans voted for the bill, so what?

    What did he claim? He claimed it had “a strong majority.” That’s a baldfaced lie and you know it. It squeaked by after bribing two states with exclusions and the extraordinary “reconciliation” measure to avoid, well, the normal reconciliation.

    Despite the delusions of you and people like you, there was nothing done in the passage of the health bill that hasn’t been done by your side many times before in all types of legislation.

    Cite? Name a bill that squeaked by that was described by a GOP President as passing with a “strong majority.” Specifically a bill that passed without a single vote from the opposing party and that was termed a strong majority.

    But note that miling here always means getting more miles per gallon, rarely does it seem to ask must you really drive all those miles?

    I included your term “hypo-miling” in the list of incremental tweaks.

    Again if my commute shrank by 5 miles per day that would be a great thing for me, even if gas was free!

    And 5 miles/day is what? 20% … 40? How is that not incremental? Remember you can get a factor of 3 to 10 from tech. Why don’t you think that’s comparable?

  15. Boonton,
    So what would you contend the percentage is (and the error bars)?

  16. Boonton,
    Oh, and how was I identified as an outsider but skin color … the kids were not from one school or school district.

  17. What did he claim? He claimed it had “a strong majority.” That’s a baldfaced lie and you know it. It squeaked by after bribing two states with exclusions and the extraordinary “reconciliation” measure to avoid, well, the normal reconciliation.

    You are aware that states do not vote on bills, Senators and Representatives do. And leaving aside the House vote, which I suppose you could argue was simply a majority, how exactly does a mathematician get off saying a 60-39 vote is not a strong majority?

    And last time I checked, votes are votes. A senator votes aye or nea. A yes vote does not magically count as less than one yes vote because you think your magic mind reading device can determine the motives for that yes vote are stupid.

    But since you seem to think you can decide which yes votes don’t count why don’t I decide which no votes shall not count? How about we start with that stupid rep. who yelled ‘you lie’ at Obama during the State of the Union? If I recall his objection was the bill would cover illegal immigrants. Since the bill does not, let’s scratch off his no vote as the product of ill informed stupidity.

    Specifically a bill that passed without a single vote from the opposing party and that was termed a strong majority.

    Why? Last time I checked a majority is 50%. If you’re over 50% you’re a majority whether or not you have votes from the minority party and 60-39 is a strong majority in my book.

    And 5 miles/day is what? 20% … 40? How is that not incremental? Remember you can get a factor of 3 to 10 from tech. Why don’t you think that’s comparable?

    You’re talking about optimizing gas. But what if gas use doesn’t bother me? Say I viewed gas the way you, say, view toilet paper. What if I told you some new tech device could cut your ass-wiping by 40%? Chances are you’d probably not be very impressed.

    Assuming I don’t consider gas a major expense (by which I mean one that will actually cause me to visibly alter my behavior), slashing gas consumption 20% likewise may not be very impressive to me but allowing me to drive 5% fewer miles may. Again to me 5% fewer miles represents more time at home, more time with family, more time to read, less wear on the car, less exposure to risk of accident and so on. One of that I get by saving on gas.

    Oh, and how was I identified as an outsider but skin color … the kids were not from one school or school district.

    Ohhh no doubt by skin color. But then you weren’t being targetted because of your skin color but because of your outsider status. If you had been raised there instead of a periodic visitor from the land of the well off chances are you would have at some point earned some position.

    Speaking of which, any hypothesis on how Mr. Zimmerman identified Martin as an outsider?

    So what would you contend the percentage is (and the error bars)?

    Percentage of what? Rabidly anti-white blacks? Very, very few. I’d be surprised if it was more than 1%.

  18. Boonton,
    So if you think it is 1% your are OK. 5% makes you a racist. Oddly enough 5 +/- 2 includes 1.

    And leaving aside the House vote, which I suppose you could argue was simply a majority, how exactly does a mathematician get off saying a 60-39 vote is not a strong majority?

    Because 60 votes were required to pass. Duh.

    But what if gas use doesn’t bother me?

    Then you’d be with Mr Limbaugh on climate change.

    But then you weren’t being targetted because of your skin color but because of your outsider status.

    Maybe, maybe not. A black outsider would not have gotten that treatment. Sounds to me like skin color/race was the problem.

  19. So if you think it is 1% your are OK. 5% makes you a racist. Oddly enough 5 +/- 2 includes 1.

    Errr, well I think you missed the part where I told JA I didn’t think he was racist (or at least the piece I read wasn’t racist). I said I thought his math/guestimates were wrong.

    Because 60 votes were required to pass. Duh.

    Actually that’s not the case, 60 votes are required to break a filibuster and force a vote but the actual vote on the bill requires a majority, not a supermajority. But even if 60 votes were required to pass that doesn’t alter the rather basic mathematical fact that 60 out of 100 is in excess of a majority.

    Maybe, maybe not. A black outsider would not have gotten that treatment. Sounds to me like skin color/race was the problem.

    From a game theory perspective consider this> For kids it’s fun to beat someone up or laugh at someone being beaten up. But it’s not fun to be beaten up yourself or laughed at.

    This makes beating up people you see on a regular basis a somewhat risky affair. They may seeth and get revenge in the future by attacking you when your guard is down. They may have friends or older siblings who may likewise be recruited to take revenge on you. Also a factor to consider is parents who may be more likely to get involved and get you in trouble.

    The equation radically changes when dealing with what you were…a total outsider who wasn’t going to be there long and wasn’t going to lay down roots. You were therefore an excellent target. The risk that your family was going to move into the inner city and they would have to contend with you on a regular basis and contend with you amassing friends and allies was minimal.

    These factors would exist with a black outsider as well (say an exchange student briefly visiting from Africa or someone’s cousin from down south visiting only for a weekend or something like that). But most plausible examples I can think of would entail a black outsider coming with at least some more solid connection to the community which raises the danger of either raising allies, or moving into town.

    You sound like you had the perfect bullying storm. Your mother had no connection to the community, everyone knew that, she was a volunteer with a ‘do-gooder’ program so everyone knew she had no incentive to make long term connections. Likewise they knew you were along for the ride and, if picked on, you would most likely just avoid coming back as opposed to staying and raising cain. As a result you became a target.

    The problem with skin color here is that I think skin color was a proxy to signal for the real traits that set you up; being without friends or allies, being in a place that was strange to you whose ways you didn’t know how to navigate well, having no long term connection to the community, in essence being weak.

    Ironically this doesn’t happen in reverse as much because while there are places that are almost exclusively black where whites will almost never go, there are very few places that blacks can be assured they will never go. Most whites can live their whole life never having any need to set foot in an area that would be called an ‘inner city’. Most blacks for school or work have to know how to navigate white communities. I think in the reverse situation, where a black mother from the inner city might have to take her young son to an area that’s heavily white and leave him relatively unsupervised for a period of time, both mother and son will be much more aware of the shift in culture and norms. Why? Because they are aware of the dynamics that skin colar has in culture, which is something you need to be if your skin color is different from 90% of the population or so. You, in contrast, never noticed such things because until then most of your interactions were in white dominated areas. As opposed to approaching the new environment with caution and hightened awareness, you approached it as any other new environment.

    Here is where I think Derb. fails to look at his stats with insight. Maybe the disproportion stats comes not from the fact that whites are better humans than blacks but that blacks, being a minority, have learned to be more cautious whereas whites being a majority are more likely to be unintentionally reckless.

    Not to say, of course, that any of this is right. Like I said kids are horrible creatures and by extension so are humans in general. I think this fact has implications in a lot of places. Consider our occupation of Afghanistan. Here we are with good intentions and a nice sounding program of nation building. We are, nonetheless, in a foreign culture relatively ignorant of its language, norms and history. Even worse, the locals know we have no intention of setting down real roots there. This is the perfect receipe for setting up your pool horror story on a grownup scale.

  20. BTW good critical piece on Derb.’s article
    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/human_nature/2012/04/john_derbyshire_trayvon_martin_and_the_ignorance_of_racial_profiling_.html

    Note that the article does NOT make a blanket assertion that Derbyshire is a filthy racist who cannot be talked about unless it is to condemm. It does have some very biting criticisms of his use of statistics. I think Derbyshire suffers a bit from the ‘hammer bias’….(i.e. to a child with a hammer all the world’s problems are nails). Derbyshire knows math very well and is comfortable with statistical truths like the law of large numbers. As a result he biases himself in favor of situations where he can apply those tools rather than any others. But you don’t decide which tool to use based on which is your favorite, you decide which one to use based on what will get the job done. If you have to cut a board you shouldn’t be using a hammer just because you’re much better with a hammer than saw.

    The piece does fail to address his argument in favor of collecting ‘token blacks’ to use as an amulet against charges of racism. But it does provide an explanation. Since Derbyshire would rather use tools like the Law of Large Numbers, which he is relativey skilled at using, than other tools like social intelligence, he has a need to ‘collect amulets’ just like the guy who insists on using a hammer to cut a piece of wood needs to collect explanations for why every board on his deck looks so ragged. It also explains why this need doesn’t seem to apply to people like Bill Maher. They command a higher degree of social intelligence.

    One final point about averages, then I promise to let up on the comments for a while! Derbyshire misses that his use of averages depends upon total ignorance of the individual that is purposefully maintained. For example, say the average lifespan of a male is 74 years. What if I told you someone’s grandfather is 82? STOP, right there you’ve introduced new data and limited your unknowns. You know that this person is a male who has already reached 82 yrs old. It’s a common mistake to say something like “well since life expectancy is 74 yrs we can expect the old geezer to drop any day now”. Not quite, someone whose 82 can expect to live another 8 years plus a bit (see http://www.annuityadvantage.com/lifeexpectancy.htm). Toss in other bits of knowledge (does he still drive? hold a job full or part time? what’s his BP? does he have diabeties or kidney failure?) and that number will change up and down….you leave behind the usefulness of the life expectancy tables that were built to cover just a few very broad bits of data (what’s this person’s gender? what’s this person’s age?)

    Statistical knowledge is helpful and can in some cases give you a very large return on your investment (learning stats is hard) but social knowledge is much more useful. A person with great social knowledge can, with great accuracy, size a man up quickly in just the first meeting. My advise to Derbyshire’s kids is if you build up your social knowledge skills you’ll probably never need your father’s math skills. You can run the world’s most powerful companies, rake in millions and for what math you do need you can pay socially inept nerds like Derbyshire pennies to do it.

  21. Boonton,
    I think we’ve hashed this out … but when the only tool you have is a hammer, sometimes you’re OK.

    And I disagree with your notions of maths.

    My advise to Derbyshire’s kids is if you build up your social knowledge skills you’ll probably never need your father’s math skills. You can run the world’s most powerful companies, rake in millions and for what math you do need you can pay socially inept nerds like Derbyshire pennies to do it.

    Yah, but maths is a lot of fun and a way to see some of the most beautiful of human constructs and ingenuity. You can’t pay for that (with money). You have to pay in sweat and lost sleep getting good enough to see it, but it’s worth it.

  22. I certainly agree with that. But Derbyshire isn’t doing math any great favor here. His use of math here is a crutch for poor social skills and he’s botching the math up too (not realizing, for example, that averages can only be pushed so far and in most social situations 15 seconds of interaction is sufficient to gather enough information to make all tables of averages totally useless)

  23. I think we’ve hashed this out … but when the only tool you have is a hammer, sometimes you’re OK.

    I don’t t hink you realized this but in context of Derbyshire you’re saying it’s OK if you lack social skills to just fall back on your math skills. Well actually it’s not ok. For one thing the man lost his job. For another thing, and this should piss you off as a conservative, he botched an opportunity in ‘being honest about race’ to bridge the gap between conservatives and blacks. Instead of saying something really insightful, he ended up just confirming what most people already suspect about conservatives and race.

    On the other hand, he has now made it ok for liberals to assert that notable black conservatives are basically sell outs and tokens rather than serious intellectual figures who merit respect.

  24. Boonton,

    I don’t t hink you realized this but in context of Derbyshire you’re saying it’s OK if you lack social skills to just fall back on your math skills.

    I don’t think you realize that many maths professionals (academic mathematicians) lack some of the practical social skills that a good high level manager has. There are even TV shows to highlight the poor social skills of maths/theory-physics academics. My point was while the latter makes more money the former sees beauty that the latter cannot. The latter with his money cannot buy the ability to see that. You offered that the rich econ/biz person with his social skills can buy maths talent for his job. It’s just not true, the most, well, precious things from maths cannot be purchased with money.

  25. Nothing wrong IMO with not having good social skills. Problem comes when one doesn’t see that as a weakness and cons themselves into thinking that math skills can replace poor social skills.

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