Friday Highlights

Good morning.

  1. A new academic econ blog, for those interested in that sort of thing. (HT)
  2. I downloaded the paper, haven’t read it yet.
  3. Cybersecurity and the latest AGW embarrassment.
  4. And here’s a possible big reason why the above actions are being taken.
  5. Racial policy and the stupid vs evil question.
  6. Mr Obama’s White House and the reverse Robin Hood effect.
  7. Why should one learn to write well?
  8. The Romney tax plan.

8 responses to “Friday Highlights

  1. 6.Mr Obama’s White House and the reverse Robin Hood effect.

    A strange way to describe 4 years of continuous tax cuts that Obama had to fight tooth and nail to get from the republicans in congress.

  2. 4.And here’s a possible big reason why the above actions are being taken

    True or false the ‘cooling trend’ disappears as soon as you incorporate sea temperatures into the mix rather than just air temps.

  3. Boonton,
    Let me know why that’s relevant.

    After all, if global temperatures are rising and the primary cause is industrialization … then a 15 year cooling period is unexpected when we’re continuing our industrialization trend, right?

  4. Let me know why that’s relevant.

    Seems kind of clear. Global warming means the earth is asorbing and retaining more thermal energy from the sun. Thermal energy is held in the air, in the ocean and on the ground surface. While atomospheric warming can be delayed for a bit by going into the ocean, entropy requires that the ocean cannot warm forever while the air stays the same.

    then a 15 year cooling period is unexpected when we’re continuing our industrialization trend,

    Why so? Also where is this cooling trend? I don’t see it on these graphs

    http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/graphs_v3/

  5. Boonton,

    Global warming means the earth is asorbing and retaining more thermal energy from the sun. Thermal energy is held in the air, in the ocean and on the ground surface.

    Not so clear. How then does the air cool and the water warm if the net input/output isn’t balanced?

  6. First off I’m still waiting to see where this 15 yr cooling is. In all of the graphs, multiple slices using multiple metrics that are all rather sensible ways to measure the issue show warming.

    Second I think you’re trying to ask how can water change its temperature at a different rate than air. I think that’s pretty obvious. Water is much denser than air. As a result the air can shed or asorb a little bit of energy to make a dramatic swing in its temperature while water does not, which is lakes and rivers do not instantly turn into sheets of ice the moment you get the first winter cold snap of below freezing weather.

    The real question isn’t so much temperature but how much thermal energy the earth is holding on its surface? This is nearly entirely due to solar thermal energy because relatively speaking the energy produced on the earth’s surface not tied to the sun (like your car engine running or a forest fire burning) is so marginal as to be almost zero compared to the sun’s output. If the earth is warming, then it will hold more thermal energy until the output (energy sent off into space) equals the input of energy coming in frm the sun. The fact that some of this energy may get soaked up into the oceans doesn’t change things. The earth would still be warming and thermodynamics gurantees that you can’t just sock all the extra energy into the water and expect it to stay there.

  7. Boonton,
    No I’m not asking how water can heat or cool at a different rate than air. I’m asking how for 15 years the water can continue to heat but the air not. Think of that radiator in the edge of your room. It’s getting hotter and hotter, and heated by the same thing as the air in your room. Yet the air is not warming up. How can that continue if the radiator is getting hotter all the time? That was my question.

    This is nearly entirely due to solar thermal energy …

    Which is why recession during of Mars ice caps and Saturns ice rings are interesting in the context of terrestrial warming and its causes.

  8. Just speaking hypothetically, the oceans are massive convection systems with cool water flowing one way on the bottom and warmer water flowing another on the top. Consider what would happen if you had some type of inversion where cool bottom water suddenly made its way in mass upwards. The ocean surface would be cooler and would therefore start ‘sucking’ heat trapped by the air. You may then get a period of cooling air temps that’s totally consistent with global warming since air warming is being delayed by ‘sinking’ the thermal energy into the deep ocean. This is why you have to measure the total thermal energy on the surface, not just air temps at one level. or one place.

    I say hypothetical because I see no 15 year cooling trend in any of the graphs I posted. Where might I find this trend?

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