Monday Highlights

Good morning. Off again today, still sleeping in. :D …. Links?

  1. Our unemployment woes.
  2. About grade and taste in the syrup world.
  3. No price gouging here. Especially if you define price in a way that make that impossible.
  4. In the wake of the Penn State kerfuffle.
  5. Oooh, somebody at the NYTimes has a really really reprehensible idea. Let’s put a price on our integrity and sell it off.
  6. We didn’t “know then” and not “know now” … we just have regulated “building” out of the realm of possibility.
  7. I wonder if the sign holder realizes the subject of his/her criticism holding the sign.
  8. 185k pages! That’s the real scandal.
  9. What the Democrats wish for in the health care realm.
  10. Tampering with history …. don’t do it. The way to do with regrettable incidents is not to whitewash, to forget and move on.
  11. US integrity and willingness to stand up for what is right … out done by the Arab league?
  12. And some wise advice.

6 Responses to Monday Highlights

  1. 11.US integrity and willingness to stand up for what is right … out done by the Arab league?

    What exactly has the Arab League done that the US hasn’t done? Kick Syria out? To my knowledge the US isn’t in any ‘Leagues’ with Syria. Call upon the president to step down? The US has already done that, check. Go to war? Errr no the Arab League has not done that.

  2. 8.185k pages! That’s the real scandal

    It would be an interesting article for some report to go through this describing exactly what such a best looks like. The number of pages doesn’t really bother me. I probably generate a hundred ‘pages’ a day or more quite easily. That is if I started printing out every email I receive and send related to work…..

    In fact, years ago we had a quirky fellow who was on our team who had kind of an odd ‘formal’ edge to him. One day he was frantically looking for an email. He pulled ou tthis huge binder that had maybe a telephone book or more of pages in it. ‘For his records’ he had printed out every email he received or sent and filed it by month. It was kind of amazing to see. What was more interesting was the one time he needed to find a particular email, he couldn’t find it. All that effort to create a perfect paper based file and it failed the time he needed it…..

  3. 3.No price gouging here. Especially if you define price in a way that make that impossible.

    I tend to agree things are indeed worth by what people are willing to pay for them. But that does not lead it to be impossible for things to be under or over priced. Prices are typically not based by the individuals involved (say in a developing market where individuals haggle over prices) but are set based on average preferences. Hence for any price you see, there will be some people who were willing to pay more so the price is ‘underpriced’ and others who would have brought if the price were a bit lower ‘overpriced’. For the seller the transaction costs in trying to determine each individual’s reservation price is too great so they simply set a single price and stick to it….even though they know some potentially profitable sales will be lost by that and some other sales that happen could have been more profitable.

  4. Boonton,
    On price gouging, how does that fit with the normal accusation of price gouging, i.e., charging a exorbitant price for staples in flood or disaster type emergencies?

  5. Boonton,
    On 185k pages … If you print on page per email … that’s still quite a bit … in the sense that too many people are being paid to produce useless boilerplate. But that begs a question. Why are they printing it at all? If these were all electronic transmissions, can’t they just deliver a flash drive to Congress? Why kill trees? Seriously? Do they want to make sure that it is hard to do electronic searching of the documents? Is that the purpose, the WH is trying to make the documents less available and more obscure?

  6. 9.What the Democrats wish for in the health care realm.

    Interesting question: Why is this a bad thing?

    On price gouging, how does that fit with the normal accusation of price gouging, i.e., charging a exorbitant price for staples in flood or disaster type emergencies?

    Not sure it does. I suppose the issue with price gouging is on one hand you have a moral qualm about people exploiting a bad situation, on the other hand you *want* the high price signals to motivate people to bring needed supplies to an emergency area, you also want a price signal to tell consumers in an emergency area to not use some consumption good if its in short supply. If gas is $8/gal in a diaster zone, that not only motivates trucks to ship gas there, it also motivates you to not run your generator so your kid can play Xbox. I’m inclined to oppose price gouging laws unless you can show me one that threads that needle gracefully.

    On 185k pages … If you print on page per email … that’s still quite a bit … in the sense that too many people are being paid to produce useless boilerplate. But that begs a question. Why are they printing it at all? If these were all electronic transmissions, can’t they just deliver a flash drive to Congress?

    well when I said I generate a hundred emails a day, keep in mind that many emails are forwards or replies which have previous emails attached at the bottom. If you felt the need to print every email you sent, you’ll end up doing a lot of reprinting of the same information over and over so I don’t think the issue is technically producing boilerplate. Another factor might be Excel spreadsheets and possibly Access Databases which could easily spin off hundreds of pages if you insisted on printing them.

    I agree with you on the flash drive. I’m not quite clear if they mean 185K pages were literally given in the form of paper or if they mean some combination of printed and electronic documents with some type of index that categorizes 185K different pieces of data.

    Do they want to make sure that it is hard to do electronic searching of the documents? Is that the purpose, the WH is trying to make the documents less available and more obscure?

    Actually I just think this is how lawyers operate. I wouldn’t worry about this too much. Each member probably has a staff of dozens and most of the documents are easy to glance and discard as irrelevant to much of anything. If there is some ‘smoking gun’, I wouldn’t think an effective way to hide it would be to bury it in documents.

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