Thursday Highlights

This afternoon (finally) I drive home. As another note, in reaction to the “civil discourse” push, I’m pushing back (like this) for the next week or so. So with that being said, let’s lock, load, and line up our sights on some links. 😀

  1. Super Bowl and the President. Chicago is Mr Obama’s “home town.” I live in a town, Lemont, and have lived there for 18+ years. In the eyes of most in my town, I’m a newcomer. I won’t be considered “from Lemont” by those in Lemont until my family has lived there for a few more generations. 
  2. Defining liberalism and a bullet list of points that define the same. Is it right? What’s missing? 
  3. Hydrolic energy storage, of which I know little.
  4. Two deathly posts from Dr Platypus here and here.
  5. I suppose it would help if I knew what “cert” meant.
  6. A conversation to watch unfold.
  7. Obamacare repeal and budget.
  8. A book noted.
  9. Speaking dismissively of athletics for intellectual development. For myself, I started cycling a sport which requires physical perseverance and endurance. Those traits are learn-able and can be improved. My impression is that training has carried over to my perseverance in non-physical matters.
  10. That undulation costs fuel … a counter suggestion.
  11. Last words on Mr L.
  12. And an aphorism on evil.

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7 comments

  1. Defining liberalism and a bullet list of points that define the same. Is it right? What’s missing?

    I’d say that list describes one subset of (economic) liberals, the ones that, as Yglesias agrees, generally fit the badly-named label “neoliberal.”

    The thing is, liberalism is really a big tent, made even bigger by the Republican retreat into propaganda-as-economics. Now people who would have been obviously labeled conservative a generation ago and who would be labeled conservative even today in nearly every other industrialized country on Earth can only survive in the Democratic Party and so are called “liberals.” See Clinton, Summers, even Obama in a lot of ways. Pretty much every economic theory other than “taxes bad! unfettered free market good!” falls under the “liberal” label these days. People with economic policies indistinguishable from Nixon or Eisenhower are now not just “liberals” but “socialists,” according to Republican propaganda.

    But of course you also still have some protectionist liberals, some union liberals, etc.

    And of course that’s only one side of liberalism. There’s also social liberalism.

    Speaking dismissively of athletics for intellectual development.

    Funny, I think of athletics (sports, anyway) as useful for geeks to develop their non-intellectual sides. Geeks, for all our strengths, live too much in the cognitive part of the brain, and are prone to dismissing everything else as silliness. (Insert critique of intellectual libertarianism here.) To succeed in sports, though, you have to learn how to live in the moment and trust your (carefully trained) instincts. If the athletic geek can combine that with his innate strengths in cognition, he can get a lot further in life — in social situations and relationships especially, but also in self-awareness and in cutting through the psychological defense mechanisms they’re all too good at rationalizing around so that they don’t even see them.

  2. Boonton says:

    Hydrolic energy storage, of which I know little.

    Could be wrong but it sounds like it might be more promising than batteries which are very heavy. A while ago I saw something on cars using compressed air tanks. What was interesting about that idea was that you could incorporate gas stations. Pull up and they swap out your near empty air tank with a full one and off you go….or plug your car into an air compressor at night to pressure up for the morning.

  3. Mark says:

    Boonton,
    The battery pack for my car, btw, is about 40 pounds. It provides up to 100 amps at 144 Volts DC, although that max current is only available for a few minutes. When you consider the 14.4kV … note that most houses have a 240 volt 50 or 100 amp service, i.e., just a little bit more.

    But … my complaint about batteries is not that they are heavy … but they are lossy. I don’t know how efficient batteries compare to compressors (of oil or air).

    One of the questions I had wondered at was whether or not a small capacity device which is much more efficient at storage and retrieval (like banks of ultra- capacititors) might be better for the storage and return of braking energy. This of course is a separate from the source of energy for the primary drive.

  4. Boonton says:

    Super Bowl and the President. Chicago is Mr Obama’s “home town.” I live in a town, Lemont, and have lived there for 18+ years. In the eyes of most in my town, I’m a newcomer. I won’t be considered “from Lemont” by those in Lemont until my family has lived there for a few more generations.

    Lemont Il has about 16K people, Chicago has 2.8M+ people. The stats probably aren’t easy to come by but I’d bet that almost everyone who lives in Lemont has done so because they were born there, married someone born there with maybe some people who moved there seeking a place to live. Chicago I’d bet has a larger turnover in people coming and going. Hence you remain a ‘new guy’ after living in a town for almost two decades but in a place like Chicago you could become an old timer in less than decade.

  5. Mark says:

    Boonton,
    I didn’t mean to be critical of Mr Obama (in this case).

    In my the NJ town in which I grew up (Pennington), the notion of not being “really from” that town never came up in the same way as Lemont. I was remarking on the “old fashioned” nature of Lemont more than anything in that respect.

  6. Boonton says:

    My impression of NJ is that people don’t really care much about their towns. Possibly because we have so many for a state that’s relatively small. Also being sandwhiched between NYC and Phillie’s media we just don’t get a lot of local coverage. I’ve heard this idea floated as a hypothesis for our corruption problems. Getting elected here takes a lot of money but unlike, say, NYC, no one pays much attention to what those who are elected actually do.

  7. Mark says:

    Boonton,
    My hometown, Lemont, is a big unusual nestled in among the outer Chicago suburbia. It is far older than most, having been founded as the first “canal” stop outside of Chicago it existed prior to expansion of Chicago past its boundaries and holds to its older buildings and history trying to keep an identity amongst larger far newer communities.